Military

Beer and Wine (But Not Liquor) Now Allowed on Military Bases

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Recently, the U.S. military started allowing wine and beer to be sold on military bases, and now distilled spirits companies are asking why they’re being treated any differently. The Wall Street Journal reports:

Spirits companies have fought for decades to convince consumers and regulators that liquor should be treated the same as beer and wine. Now they’re taking on the U.S. military.

The Defense Department this summer began allowing military commissaries—the equivalent of grocery stores on bases—to sell beer and wine for the first time but not vodka, whiskey and other types of liquor. The ruling sparked an outcry among spirits makers who have since lobbied lawmakers to ensure their products can be sold in commissaries, too…

The whole article can be found here. R Street’s Jarrett Dieterle and Arthur Rizer have previously argued that soldiers should also be allowed to drink starting at age 18.

Why Can’t Native Americans Make Whiskey?

Image courtesy of  New York Times

Image courtesy of New York Times

R Street's Jarrett Dieterle and Kevin Kosar took to the pages of the New York Times this week to explain why Native Americans are still not allowed to distill on tribal lands. The reason traces back to an antiquated 1834 federal law, which they argue its far past time to repeal:

In 2016, the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, in southeastern Washington State, began selling craft spirits and beer at a restaurant in their Lucky Eagle casino. But when the Chehalis wanted to start making their own hooch, the federal government said no.

The Bureau of Indian Affairs informed the tribe that federal law prohibits the building of a distillery on tribal grounds. The Chehalis would have to continue to purchase spirits from producers off the reservation.

Small-scale distilling is a booming business, providing much-needed jobs and revenue for state and local governments. So why are Indian tribes legally prevented from joining in? ...

Read the whole piece here.

 

 

The Military and Whiskey's 250-Year Relationship

R Street's Kevin Kosar has written a history of whiskey in the military for KCET. He traces the intertwined relationship of booze and troops from early America to the present: 

"Whiskey, as any enlistee will tell you, is popular among America’s fighting forces. Military installations’ drinks shops (“Class 6” stores) are stocked with a galaxy of intoxicating drinks — beer, spirits, wines — but whiskey is especially popular. And it isn’t just any whiskey — it’s the American-made bourbons, ryes and Tennessee whiskeys that really move off the shelves.

Certainly, the popularity of whiskey among soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines can be explained partly as a reflection of American taste in general. Americans purchased more than 30 million cases of American whiskeylast year, according to the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States.

But for military men and women, whiskey holds an additional appeal beyond its glorious amber color, robust flavor and mood-alleviating powers — it may even be more American than apple pie (which seems to have been invented in England). Whiskey has been with the America’s armed forces since the earliest days of the republic..."

Read the whole piece here.