Kosar and Dieterle on the Meaning of the Tennessee Wine SCOTUS Case

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As we noted last week, the Supreme Court struck an important blow for freedom in its Tennessee Wine v. Thomas decision, which held that Tennessee’s requirement that liquor store owners be residents of the state was unconstitutional. R Street’s Jarrett Dieterle and Kevin Kosar explain in a piece for USA Today how the implications of this decision could be far reaching, especially when it comes to direct-to-consumer alcohol shipping:

Just after the 100th anniversary of Prohibition’s start — and over 85 years since its repeal — Americans could be forgiven for assuming that government remains blissfully removed from their cocktail glass. Unfortunately across the country, states and local governments still enforce a bevy of outdated and oftentimes downright silly alcohol laws. While these laws have proved notoriously difficult to get rid of, a new Supreme Court decision issued could spell the end for a broad swath of cronyist and antiquated booze rules — and perhaps be the first step toward a more national alcohol marketplace…

The court’s holding might seem limited to the unique circumstances of Tennessee’s law, but it has the potential to be a game changer in the world of booze. The biggest change could involve the shipment and transportation of alcohol.

Unlike just about every other product on the market today — nearly all of which can arrive at your door in two days — direct-to-consumer alcohol shipping is incredibly limited. While a previous Supreme Court case allowed wineries to ship their bottles to consumers in neighboring states, very few states allow out-of-state retail stores — not to mention breweries and distilleries — to engage in interstate shipments.

Under the logic of the court’s holding in Tennessee Wine, however, allowing in-state shipments of alcohol while forbidding out-of-state shipments violates the Constitution. If more of these laws are challenged accordingly, it could mean that a Michigander could soon be able to have her favorite Vermont beer shop send IPAs directly to her door…

Read the whole piece here.