The Supreme Court Just Struck a Blow for Alcohol Freedom

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The Supreme Court finally released its long-awaited decision in Tennessee Wine v. Thomas this week. The case involved a challenge to Tennessee’s “durational residency requirement” law, which said that in order to operate a retail alcohol store in Tennessee, the store owner must have been a resident of the state for 2 years. And in order to renew the license, which was required annually, the owner needed to be a resident of the state for 10 years. The law even required that all officers and directors of companies that ran alcohol retail stores—as well as 100% of all stockholders—to be state residents.

The Court, in a 7-2 decision, struck down the Tennessee law for violating the U.S. Constitution’s so-called Dormant Commerce Clause. To put it simply, this doctrine holds that states cannot discriminate against out-of-state economic interests while favoring in-state economic interests. The Tennessee residency requirement obviously favored in-staters over out-of-staters, but the law’s defenders argued that the 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (which repealed Prohibition but granted broad powers to state governments to regulate alcohol) immunized laws like Tennessee’s from constitutional scrutiny. While the Court emphatically rejected that argument, its holding also could have broader implications:

Before Americans can enjoy a nationally cohesive alcohol shipping marketplace, however, much work remains. Many states still discriminate against out-of-state retailers interested in shipping alcohol—laws which will almost certainly be challenged in light of the Court’s decision. And nearly every state still labors under a three-tier system of alcohol distribution, which mandates a role for wholesalers when it comes to most alcohol sales. Furthermore, the U.S. Post Office forbids the shipment of alcohol entirely (although some private carriers permit it).

Therefore, governments around the country will have to take proactive steps to liberalize their alcohol shipping laws and streamline them in a way that makes interstate alcohol shipping more achievable. But for now, the Supreme Court’s decision in Tennessee Wine can be seen as an early step toward a more robust interstate shipping market for booze.

DrinksReform.org will have more coverage of the Tennessee Wine case and its aftermath in the weeks ahead!