Pennsylvania May Finally Scrap Flexible Pricing Authority for Spirits

shutterstock_563368003.jpg

As covered before on these pages, Pennsylvania grants broad power to its liquor regulatory agency—the PLCB—to set the price mark-ups for distilled spirits sold in its state-run retail stores. R Street’s Jarrett Dieterle has previously pointed out that liquor mark-ups in control states function analogously to taxes, especially when the money they generate flows to the state’s general fund. This week in The American Spectator, R Street’s Kevin Kosar discusses an effort afoot in the Pennsylvania legislature to at least limit the unilateral power of the PLCB to set mark-up levels:

Keystone State legislators may abolish Pennsylvania’s stealth drinks tax. The House Liquor Control Committee is examining HB 1512, which would end the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board’s “flexible pricing” power.

Rep. Jesse Topper, the measure’s primary sponsor, argues that flexible pricing power is not a power one should give to a monopoly. “[T]he PLCB is neither constrained by market discipline nor antitrust laws,” he wrote.

Topper’s bill would repeal the flexible pricing provision “in order to reinstitute some kind of consumer protection.” If enacted, the PLCB would revert to using a longstanding pricing system that set spirit prices by a formula

[F]lexible pricing is effectively a stealth tax and may therefore raise constitutional questions. Instead of elected officials setting income- or sales-tax rates to cover the cost of government, the pricing mechanism has enabled the state Legislature to outsource revenue-raising authority to an executive agency…”

Read Kevin’s whole piece here.