Effort to Lower BAC Level Spreads to More States

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Last year, Utah became the first state to lower the blood-alcohol limit for drunk driving from .08 to .05. Utah’s change was followed by a report from the National Academy of Sciences, calling for more states to follow suit. Now, several states are considering .05-level legislation, including Michigan, California, and New York. The OC Register’s editorial board weighed in one why a lower limit could be counterproductive:

Many people drink less while out at pubs or restaurants to avoid getting stopped for DUI. Such arrests can lead to jail stays, costly legal bills and the loss of one’s driver’s license. People who actually are impaired deserve those harsh punishments, but we fear that reducing the legal limit will mainly ensnare people who might not be impaired. The goal should be removing drunks from the road, not arresting non-drunks.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data show that 92 percent of alcohol-related fatalities involve a driver with a BAC of 0.10, according to Jackson Shedelbower of the American Beverage Institute. This confirms other information we’ve seen: the main drunken-driving dangers come from a relatively small group of heavy drinkers, not from people who have had a glass of wine or two with dinner…

We fear that lowering the BAC will simply make it easier for police agencies to set up checkpoints and then issue press releases about the growing number of drunken drivers that they have removed from the road. Yet it’s better to divert scarce resources to programs and policing efforts that capture the real scofflaws…

Read the rest here.