Utah Partially Repeals Its Weak Beer Laws

shutterstock_1154689240.jpg

In December of last year, R Street’s Jarrett Dieterle took to the pages of The Salt Lake Tribune to call on Utah politicians to scrap the state’s ‘weak beer’ law, which forbids grocery stores from selling beer over 3.2 percent alcohol by weight. According to the Tribune, Utah lawmakers have reached a deal to raise the limit to 4.0 percent, although they were unable to secure a full repeal:

Utah lawmakers have struck a deal to let higher-alcohol beer be sold in Utah grocery and convenience stores.

House members signed off on the measure Wednesday by a 61-14 vote, sending the bill back to the Senate for a final vote that is expected to occur Thursday.

This second substitute bill would boost the cap on retail beer from 3.2 percent to 4 percent by weight, a level that would include the majority of beer that already is in retail outlets, said bill sponsor, Sen. Jerry Stevenson, R-Layton…

The initial version of SB132 would have hiked the alcohol limit on retail beer from its current 3.2 percent by weight to 4.8 percent. Utah’s predominant faith, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, opposed that plan.

Last week, that proposal, which already had been approved by the Senate, was gutted by a House committee and replaced with language that would create a task force to study the issue.

Wednesday’s version is a blend of the two bills. 

Read the rest here.