Tennessee Cracks Down on Online Alcohol Sales

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Regulators in Tennessee are ramping up enforcement efforts against online booze sales on websites like Craigslist, according to The Tomahawk:

Law Enforcement Agents from The Alcoholic Beverage Commission conduct statewide sting operations targeting the online sale of liquor. No two states are alike when it comes to liquor laws, and most are changing from year to year. Anyone intending to sell alcohol through a home delivery service, whether by mail order or online, must hold a valid liquor license.

Seventeen suspects were charged with illegal sales of alcoholic beverages resulting from statewide sting operations targeting online ads on Craigslist and other social media outlets. Agents seized sixty-nine bottles of alcohol that were sold to them during the undercover operations which took place on street corners, parking lots, and places of business...

More here.

As booze expert Chuck Cowdery has explained, such crackdowns are the result of the absence--and illegality--of a secondary alcohol market in the United States:

There is, on the internet, a very active secondary market in rare bourbons and other alcoholic beverages. People offer bottles for sale or indicate bottles they would like to buy. Transactions are arranged by email or other private messaging. This happens on Facebook and Craigslist, and probably many other places. I’m not going to point you to any of them. They aren’t hard to find.

Unfortunately, in the United States the secondary market in alcoholic beverages is illegal. I’ve written about this before, as recently as October.

R Street's Kevin Kosar has also previously called for legalizing the secondary booze market.