How the Tennessee Wine v. Byrd SCOTUS Case Could Impact Wine Shipments

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As previously highlighted, the Supreme Court is considering a challenge to Tennessee’s residency requirement, which mandates that state liquor retailers must be residents of the state for 2-9 years before opening a store. As Liza Zimmerman recounts for Forbes, the case could have profound implications on interstate wine shipments:

For the first time in more than a decade, the U.S. government has shown a willingness to reevaluate how wine and spirits are sold, both within and between various states in the country.

In fact, the case of Tennessee Wine and Spirits Retailers Association v. Clayton Byrd (Tenn. v. Byrd) represents only the second such move by the high court since the repeal of Prohibition in 1933.

When Prohibition was repealed, the U.S. government decided that the safest way to regulate alcohol sales was by giving each state the right to decide how wine and spirits were sold within its borders. That resulted in a fractured legal arrangement in which almost every state handled the sale and shipment of drinks differently…

The biggest issue about the case is how the court may reevaluate the legal intricacies of interstate shipping. Retailers, with brick-and-mortar locations in distant states, had long been allowed to ship into other states. This was a right that most store owners thought had been set in stone by the 2005 Supreme Court case of Granholm v Heald.

However, as retailers in certain states and wholesalers began to worry losing a share of their revenue to out-of-state players, they put more pressure on shipping services such as UPS and FedEx to follow the letter of the law to the finest degree. As of a year ago, the bulk of major interstate shippers have been shipping into only 14 states and the District of Columbia….

Read the whole article here.