Pennsylvania Legislative Committee Considers Modest Liquor Licensing Reform

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Like many states, Pennsylvania has strict tied-house laws stemming from the post-Prohibition era. As a result, some Keystone State breweries have had trouble with things like leasing space or property from an entity that possesses a restaurant or retailing license. According to The Legal Intelligencer, a key legislative committee may advance reforms to this law:

"The Pennsylvania House of Representatives’ Liquor Control Committee is set to vote on a measure to lift liquor licensing restrictions that have been in place since the repeal of Prohibition.

On Tuesday, the committee is expected to pass amendments to the Liquor Code in HB 1902, a measure introduced by the committee chairman, Rep. Adam Harris, R-Juniata. If passed by the General Assembly, the bill would end the state’s practice of “interlocking prohibition,” a form of tied-house law that disallows holders of liquor manufacturing licenses from also holding retail bar and restaurant licenses.

Tied-house laws make it illegal for a manufacturer to induce a retailer to sell only one brand of liquor. Lawmakers said the current letter of Pennsylvania law presents modern-day problems. For example, under the law, a landlord with a license to serve alcohol couldn’t lease space to a manufacturer of alcohol..."

Read more here.